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Can I Foster if?

Many people ask us some variation of the question "Can I foster if....". Therefore, we've collated and answered some of the most commonly asked questions to help alleviate any concerns that you may have regarding whether you can foster.

Can I Foster if....

I’m gay?
A person’s sexual orientation has no bearing on their ability to foster. If you can offer a child or young person a safe and loving home, then it makes no difference whether your gay, straight or bi.

I’m transgender?
Yes, you absolutely can foster if you are transgender. A person’s gender does not affect their ability to offer a child or young person a safe and loving home.

I’m not a British citizen?

You don’t have to be a British citizen in order to become a foster carer. We need people from all backgrounds to become carers. As a rule, if you have the right to work in the UK, and you’re a full time resident, then you can apply to foster.

English isn’t my first language?

If you have a good level of spoken English (in order to help support children through their education as well as communicate with other professionals), then not having English as a first language is no hindrance to being able to foster. In fact, there are many children whose first language is not English, and who need foster homes. Being able to communicate with them in their chosen language can be a huge advantage for the child or young person in your care.

I practice a religion?
Your religion, or lack of religious faith, does not affect your ability to become a foster carer. In fact, it can be a benefit when we are matching children to ensure that they can live in a foster home which reflects their religious or cultural needs. However, you would need to consider how you feel about discussing issues such as alternative religious beliefs or certain ethical issues with a child, ensuring that you abide by our policies on inclusivity and diversity.

I’m single?
You don’t have to be married or in a relationship to foster. We have many amazing single people who do great work offering loving and caring homes to children in their care.

I’m a single man?

As long as you can offer a child or young person a safe and loving home then being a single man makes no difference to your ability to foster.

I have a new partner?

We ask that couples who are in a new relationship take time to get to know each other before applying to foster. Being a foster carer can be stressful, and relationships need to be secure enough to manage this. When you have been together for at least a year, then you will be able to apply to foster.

I’m over 60?

Your age will not be a barrier to fostering. The average age of foster parents in the UK is 55, and we just ask that you have the fitness, health and stamina required to care for children.

I have a criminal record?
A criminal record does not necessarily stop you from becoming a foster carer. We would discuss your specific offence with you and what you have learnt from your experience. Sometimes, people who have made mistakes in the past make some of the best foster parents. There are however some crimes that would prevent you becoming a foster carer, for example, if your offence was committed against a child

I don't have my own children?
You don’t have to have your own children in order to foster. We provide you with all of the training required and help you gain skills and experience to prepare you for fostering.

We hope that we've helped to dispel some of the myths around who can foster, therefore if you would like to learn more then please don’t hesitate to get in touch. You can contact us by using the live chat option in the bottom right corner of your screen, by filling in the form below, by email (info@familyfosteringpartners.co.uk) or by phone (0330 094 8816).

 

 

 

 

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